Share It!

How Do You Brew?

As the craft beer industry continues to evolve, we recognize that each of our customers has a growing set of distinct brewing needs. In order to meet these needs, we not only focus on supplying premium hops, but a variety of the highest quality hop products as well. In addition to whole hops and hop pellets, we offer variety specific hop oils, hop extracts and other downstream products. For more information on each of these individual products, please read below.

  • Whole Hop Cones

    Whole Hop Cones

    Whole Hop Cones

    Product Name: Whole Hop Cones or Raw Hops

    Description: Leaf hops are the dried and pressed natural inflorescences of the female hop plant. During harvest, these inflorescences or "cones" are removed from the plants, dried and pressed into bales on the farm. They are supplied to brewers as whole or part bales ready for immediate use.

    Uses and Advantages in Brewing: Leaf hops are usually added either to the boiling wort in the kettle, or after fermentation for dry-hopping. For maximum aroma, additions should be made at end of boil during whirlpool to capture as much of the volatile oil as possible. For maximum bittering, additions need to be made one hour before the end of the boil. Additions made approximately 10-15 minutes prior to the end of the boil will provide late-hop character. Dry-hopping additions are usually made prior to fermentation and the hops can remain in the product for several days or, in some cases, until the product is consumed. The main advantage of whole hops is the perception of utilizing a completely natural ingredient. The disadvantages are handling, storage, variability and inconsistency in brewing values.

    Composition: 

     

    Product Use: A pre-weighted quantity of leaf hops should be crumbled gently by hand prior to addition. Following the boil, the hop remains sink to the bottom of the kettle and can be separated from the hopped wort. Often, dry-hopping hops are suspended in the beer in a permeable sachet which greatly assists their removal.

    Typical utilizations of leaf hops (bittering) range from 25-28% of the alpha acids added. The intensity of late hop character depends not only on the amount added, but also on the length of time the hops are in contact with the boiling wort. Typical dry hopping rates range between 3-6 oz. /BBL.

    Analysis: Whole Hops are analyzed for α-acids, β-acids, and Hop Storage Index (HSI) using UV Spectrophotometry in accordance with all ASBC guidelines.

    Packaging: Whole Hops are sold in the following quantities:

    • Bales (US Bales = 200 lbs / Import bales = 120 lbs)
    • ½ Bales (US = 100 lbs / Import = 60 lbs)
    • ¼ Bales (50 lbs, vacuum sealed and nitrogen flushed)
    • Mini-bales (13 lbs, vacuum sealed and nitrogen flushed)

     

    Storage and Best By Recommendations: For maximum protection of bitterness potential and aroma, whole hops should be stored in temperatures below 35°F. Vacuum sealing the whole hops with an inert gas in a laminated plastic/aluminum foil pouch will drastically reduce the rate of oxidation and is recommended for long term storage.

    Technical Support: We will be pleased to offer support on the use of Whole Hops in brewing. For assistance, please contact our knowledgeable staff at 1-800-952-4873 or email info@alphaanalyticstesting.com.

    Download MSDS PDF

  • Hop Pellets

    Hop Pellets

    Hop Pellets

    Product Name: Hop Pellets

    Description: T-90 hop pellets are prepared from whole leaf hops which have been hammer-milled into a powder and the subsequently pressed through a conventional pellet die. Hop pellets retain all of their natural vegetative and lupulin material and can be used as a full replacement for leaf hops in the brewing process.

    T-45 hop pellets are prepared in a similar fashion, however, after milling at a very low temperature (which removes the stickiness of the lupulin) the powder is sieved and a portion of the vegetative material is removed. T-45 pellets can also be used as a full replacement for leaf hops in the brewing process.

    Baled hops are broken up and passed into an air-stream which delivers them to a ¾” hammer-mill. Heavy, foreign materials drop out while metal fragments are removed using magnets. The hop cones are milled until they pass through a sieve, which is commonly composed of 9-12 mm mesh. The resulting powder is mixed and homogenized in a blender, and then conveyed to a pellet die, most commonly 4 or 6 mm in diameter. Once the pellets are formed, they are passed through a pellet shaker (to eliminate undersized product and remove residual loose powder) and immediately conveyed to a cooling tank where refrigerated nitrogen reduces the pellet temperature as rapidly as possible. From the cooling tank, the pellets are packaged with an airtight, nitrogen flush system.

    With T-45 pellets, milling of the hops is carried out at 95°C. This removes the stickiness from the lupulin and allows the powder to be sieved. This results in a resin-rich fraction which contains about 50% of the vegetable matter and virtually resin-free waste. The resin rich fraction is forwarded to the pellet die and a portion of the vegetative material may be re-introduced to adjust the alpha acid content to a pre-determined level. Pelletizing and packing is then the same as T-90 pellets.

    Composition: The composition of T-90 hop pellets is similar to that of leaf hops and, depending on the variety, displays ranges in composition as follows:

    For T-45 pellets, the composition of alpha acids and other components of lupulin may be at any level up to twice that of the equivalent T-90 form. The vegetative matter compositions may vary to about one-half of that shown.

    Uses and Advantages in Brewing: T-90 pellets achieve a significant reduction in bulk volume compared to leaf hops. The volume reduction is further enhanced with T-45 pellets. Additionally, the packaging prevents the deterioration brought about by oxidation of the resins and oils of leaf hops.

    Within the brewing process, T-90 and T-45 pellets may, depending upon the circumstances, show an increase in the utilization of alpha acids of up to 20% over that of leaf hops.

    Standardization of the alpha acids content of T-90 and T-45 pellets allows the establishment of accurate and consistent routine procedures by the brewer.+

    Methods of Use: Both T-90 and T-45 pellets are added to boiling wort in the kettle at the same time as one would normally add leaf hops. The pellets will disperse into the wort and form part of the trub, thus removing the need for a hop strainer. For maximum bitterness, pellets should be boiled for at least one hour. For maximum aroma contribution, pellets should be added for normal late hop additions.

    Alpha acids utilizations from pellets under normal brewing conditions range between 30-35%. The flavor and aroma effects are typical for the variety in question and the time of addition.

    Analysis: Both T-90 and T-45 hops pellets are analyzed for α-acids, β-acids, and the Hop Storage Index (HSI) using UV Spectrophotometry following ASBC guidelines.

    Storage and Best By Recommendations: For maximum protection of bitterness potential and aroma, T-90 and T-45 pellets should be cold stored in unopened packs. Under these conditions minimal deterioration will occur for as long as one year of storage. Opened packs should be used within a few hours or re-sealed and deep frozen.

    Technical Support: We will be pleased to offer support on the use of T-90 or T-45 Hop Pellets in brewing. For assistance, please contact our knowledgeable staff at 1-800-952-4873 or email info@alphaanalyticstesting.com.

    Download MSDS PDF